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A view into our world at Suzanne Lovell, Inc. and the ideas that inspire us daily. 

A Rhode Island icon, the Arcade Providence was designed in 1828  by Russel Warren and James Bucklin. With the  distinction of being America's oldest shopping mall, this grand monument was set to close in 2008 even though it gained National Landmark status in 1976. Preservationists fought hard for the arcade's revival and secured a $10 million dollar makeover. Yay!

With businesses and small shops occupying the bottom two floors of the building, the top two floors were converted into 48 micro-apartments. So enticing was the renovation, that 4,000 people remain on the wait-list. We're so glad this 188-year-old building got a second lease at life!

Rightfully, the Arcade Providence earned National Historic Landmark status. The heavy Greek Revival columns, granite walls, and classic facades remain in amazing condition. Our favorite features are the granite steps which lead up to a stunning, light-filled atrium.

Image courtesy of: Arcade Providence

The stately Ionic columns and sunlight-filled atrium with the glass gable roof from the start... looks very similar, no?

Image courtesy of: Curbed (Rhode Island Collection)

With singles increasingly contributing to a large portion of our general population, micro-apartments are helping alleviate the housing problems which plague many of the US's metropolitan cities.

Image courtesy of: Northeast Community Architects

We love that these apartments come fully furnished... not that much furniture is needed for such a mini place!

Image courtesy of: Arch Daily

Posted in: Architecture
Tagged: RENOVATION RHODE ISLAND MICRO APARTMENTS

At the young age of 29, Jean Royere resigned from a posh position in the import-export trade industry and decided to become an interior designer. This Frenchman had a sense of humor about his designs.  He followed closely after the works of Jean Pouve and Charlotte Perriand.  In 1934, Royere opened a design studio in Paris and was soon designing for King Farouk, King Hussein of Jordan, and the Shah of Iran to name just a few.  

Today, Jean Royere is on the minds of many Hollywood collectors. Royere's whimsical simplicity is refreshing after the era of Bauhaus' straight lines. We invite you to take a look at his designs and recognize the humor in his furniture; for example, the choices of fur coverings along with his open, light and bright lighting designs.

Self-taught, Royere said all he was trying to do was create a “harmonious spectacle to enchant the eye, rejoice the heart and elevate the spirit." Thanks Jean Royere, you accomplished your intention!

Royere's iconic elephant chairs... these recognizable chairs are extremely comfortable!

Image courtesy of: Decor Arts Now

From 1949, this three-seat curved-shaped sofa with a banana-shaped backrest stands elegantly on cylindrical legs. Originally created and called ‘Boule’ ("ball" in French), it is first recorded as being upholstered in off-white wool... you guessed it, resembling a polar bear!

Image courtesy of: Agent of Style

Called "Salon Sculpture", the sofa and two chairs circa 1955 is a set of three. Made from beech wood and fabric. We love!

Image courtesy of: deSpoke

Who doesn't love, and recognize, this egg chair? Is made even more fun in this great yellow color! The OEuf' chair is circa 1950-1959, made from oak and fabric. Dimensions: 25.6 x 25.2 x 28.3 inches.

Image courtesy of: ArtNet

This "Yoyo Lamp" shows Royere's wide range in design. 

Image courtesy of: Design Gallerist, Galerie Patrick Seguin

Posted in: Interior Design
Tagged: FURNITURE INTERIOR DESIGNER JEAN ROYERE FRENCH DESIGNER

Edna Andrad, Tribute to King, 1968, acrylic on canvas, 40”X 40”. Locks Gallery   

Image courtesy of: Galerie Magazine

Designed by Gerrit Thomas Rietveld (Dutch, 1888–1964), manufactured by Gerard van de Groenekan (Dutch, 1904–1994), Red-Blue Chair, designed 1917–18, produced ca. 1950, Painted beech and plywood, 34 15/16” × 23 5/8” × 25 7/8”, Layton Art Collection, Inc.

Image courtesy of: The Milwaukee Art Museum, photographed by: John Nienhuis

Hermes, Black and Grey ‘Perspective’ Silk Scarf', designed by A.M. Cassandre and first issued in 1951, Circa Vintage London 

Image courtesy of: 1st Dibs
 
Solange, Square Green & Yellow Hypnotic Rugs, 100% wool, made-to-order. 
 
Image courtesy of: Solange
"Wedding Rug", designed by Suzanne Lovell, Inc. Silk sewing thread handwoven rug by Sam Kasten. 

Image courtesy of: Suzanne Lovell, Inc.
Posted in: Interior Design
Tagged: GEOMETRIC COLOR STORY

Chara Schreyer: Art House

January 30, 2017
Chara Schreyer is living with "Fine Art & Sculpture" in a way few true collectors are able to master. With the help of architect and designer Gary Hutton, Schreyer has spread her large collection across several homes in California, two of which I was lucky enough to see and tour with Chara herself. I was so thrilled to see her that new book, ART HOUSE, written by Alisa Carroll, has all of the memorable art installations captured just as I had seen them. The magic of it all is that Schreyer has not only been collecting the best of the best, but she has also very thoughtfully created a dialogue between pieces within a running story that is different for each of her homes. What a gift for a collector to be able to create particular spaces for the treasures they shepherd. Each piece was made even more memorable because of its careful placement and thoughtful surroundings. 

Chara Schreyer has accomplished the BIG IDEA: “HOME AS GALLERY”. Get the book and enjoy indulging!!

“The collection throughout these 5 homes showcases work by artists who have positively
changed the course of history.”  Chara Schreyer
 

 Image courtesy of: Suzanne Lovell, Inc.

Man’s Ray’s Cadeau (Gift). The Original Cadeau was the first Dada
object produced by the artist in France. December 6, 1921 Man Ray purchased an iron and carpentry tacks and made the object, only to have it stolen from the gallery that afternoon.

Carroll, Alisa, Chara Schreyer, Neal David Benezra, and Matthew Millman. Art House: The Collaboration of Chara Schreyer & Gary Hutton. New York, NY: Assouline, 2016. Photo on Page 24-25.

Christopher Wool’s Untitled

Carroll, Alisa, Chara Schreyer, Neal David Benezra, andMatthew Millman. Art House: The Collaboration of Chara Schreyer & Gary Hutton. New York, NY:Assouline, 2016. Print. Photo on Page 35.

A Larry Bell cube echoes the architecture of downtown San Francisco.

Carroll, Alisa, Chara Schreyer, Neal David Benezra, and Matthew Millman. Art House: The Collaboration of Chara Schreyer & Gary Hutton. New York, NY: Assouline, 2016. Print. Photo on Page 71.

Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing #114 (detail) was drawn on-site by the artist’s assistant over the course of 12 days. The concept of the work is embodied in a certificate of ownership; if Schreyer were to move the work would have to be painted over, but could be redrawn at her new location.

Carroll, Alisa, Chara Schreyer, Neal David Benezra, and Matthew Millman. Art House: TheCollaboration of Chara Schreyer & Gary Hutton. New York, NY: Assouline, 2016. Print. Photo on Page 76-77.

Mark BradfordA Thousand Daddies. Measures 18 x 24 feet; there are 42 panels hung-seventeen are in storage. 

Carroll, Alisa, Chara Schreyer, Neal David Benezra, and MatthewMillman. Art House: The Collaboration of Chara Schreyer & Gary Hutton. New York, NY: Assouline,2016. Print. Photo on Page 150-151.

Carroll, Alisa, Chara Schreyer, Neal David Benezra, and Matthew Millman. Art House: TheCollaboration of Chara Schreyer & Gary Hutton. New York, NY: Assouline, 2016. Print. Photo on Page 157-158.

Ruth Asawa’s Untitled S. 437. Ms. Schreyer acquired at auction. The original owner was a dancer who attended Black Mountain College with Asawa.

Carroll, Alisa, Chara Schreyer, NealDavid Benezra, and Matthew Millman. Art House: The Collaboration of Chara Schreyer & GaryHutton. New York, NY: Assouline, 2016. Print. Photo on Page 163.

Carroll, Alisa, Chara Schreyer, Neal David Benezra, and Matthew Millman. Art House:The Collaboration of Chara Schreyer & Gary Hutton. New York, NY: Assouline, 2016. Print. Photo on Page 168, 169.

Posted in: Welcome to My Cage
Tagged: SCULPTURE Fine Art collector

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