Manhattan Pied-à-terre

About this project

This light and bright pied-à-terre is located in Midtown Manhattan with sweeping views of Central Park and the New York City skyline. The client’s blue chip contemporary art collection create the featured moments in this minimal residence with a well-curated sculptural and iconic design furniture.

Olafur Eliasson

Olafur Eliasson (Danish, b. 1967), Color experiment no. 15, 2010, Oil on round canvas, 39.4” diameter.

Jim Dine

Jim Dine (American, b. 1935), Fast Red Belt, 2009.

Mark Bradford

Mark Bradford (American, b. 1961), Kryptonite, 2006. Billboard paper, photomechanical reproductions, acrylic gel medium, carbon paper, acrylic, tape and additional mixed media on paper.

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama (Japanese, b. 1929), Dots, 1990.

Robert Mapplethorpe

Robert Mapplethorpe (American, 1946-1989), A Collection of (3) photographs of Lisa Lyon, 1981-2, printed 1990, Each from an edition of 10

Joel Shapiro

Joel Shapiro (American, b. 1941), Untitled, 2009 – 2010, Wood and casein, 55 ¼” x 46 ½” x 14”.

“They are to be admired for their good business sense as well as their exceptional design sense.”

—Client, San Francisco

“For Suzanne Lovell, a well-designed room serves as a frame for the art it displays.”

—Architectural Digest

“They have the highest expectations of themselves, the contractors, their clients and the final product. While some probably cannot appreciate this exacting methodology, I could not be satisfied any other way.”

—Client, Manhattan

Antony Gormley

Antony Gormley (British, b. 1950), Standing Matter V, 2007.
Forged steel ball bearings.

Yves Klein

Yves Klein (French, 1928-1962), Table d’Or, 1961. Glass, Plexiglass, 1,500 Gold Leaf sheets, Chromed Aluminum. The installation takes several hours as each gold leaf sheet is placed individually.

Wendell Castle

Wendell Castle (American, b. 1932), Lap Dog, 2008, Stained Cherry with oil finish, Unique.
Since the outset of his career, Wendell Castle has consistently challenged the traditional boundaries of functional design and established himself as the father of the American studio furniture movement. Castle is renowned for his superb craftsmanship, his whimsically organic forms and his development of original techniques for shaping solid, stack-laminated wood.

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