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Culture

Modernized “Antique” Water Bottles

October 15, 2017

Image courtesy of: Talia Mukmel, photographed by: Ben Yuster.

The Israeli artist, Talia Mukmel, has a long history of design inspirations to draw from. As a third-generation member of a family that specializes in working with textiles, Mukmel has long been exposed to the process of utilizing materials for crafting. As a craft designer, Mukmel always gives her objects identity and meaning. She firmly subscribes to the old notion that you should form an emotional connection to the object you produce. In such, her products elicit a special bond due to the intricate and laborious hand-crafting process that goes into the process of production.

 Image courtesy of: Talia Mukmel, photographed by: Ben Yuster

Growing up in Israel and graduating from the Bezalel Academy of Arts and Design in Jerusalem (2002), this Tel Aviv-based designer has plenty of influences surrounding her. Growing up in a country that has thousands and thousands of years of history everywhere you look, Mukmel was inspired daily.

Mukmel’s project, “Revolve”, came to fruition after a study into historical water storing methods. Throughout the years, archeologists have gathering a lot of information from ancient civilizations regarding the artifacts they used to move water to and fro. Mukmel wanted to come up with a modernized water bottle that still held true to the references of historical times.

Image courtesy of: Talia Mukmel, photographed by: Ben Yuster.

After much experimentation to find the right material both esthetically and functionally, Mukmel came upon a specific type of plastic that worked for her desired purposes. The bioplastic (PHA), a manufactured plastic produced from the starch found in corn and sugar cane, was the one material that allowed for the manipulation that Mukmel desired. The grains from PHA allowed the material to retain details of ancient hand-crafting.

Image courtesy of: Design Break Online, photographed by: Daniel Shechter.

Paying homage to the work of prior generations is important to Mukmel. She likes to “time-travel” between present day and ancient times, attempting to find balance between the two.

Especially with Mukmel’s recent project, “Revolve” brings to light our generation’s obsession with the “water bottle”. As trends shift between what to drink from, the “Revolve” series water bottles will always stay true to themselves. Mukmel’s series of bottles maintain their authenticity even through the modern production techniques and materials they undergo and possess.

Image courtesy of: Retail Design Blog.

Mukmel subscribes to the ancient notion that the designer should have an emotional connection to his product. Her objects clearly personify that connection in addition to being wonderful examples of combining the new with the old.

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